Bring Back the Underground Raves

Whatever happened to PLUR life you might ask yourself? We now find ourselves in fields filled with thousands of people, bass blasting through 20 speakers piled on each other vibrating into the core of an onlooker 200 ft. away as they hug a tree expecting it to hug them back. What’s wrong with this scene? Nothing actually, but wouldn’t it be nice to find ourselves searching the streets for that guy named Dan, to tell us the password for the next guy, Joe, under a bridge to finally give us the ambiguous destination filled with promise of dance and underground EDM?


Photo is not property of BFS

Photo is not property of BFS

The scene for raves has sincerely changed, evolving from underground warehouse parties, to more official rave scenes, to larger Mayhems, to music festivals and beyond. The original PLUR life has been skewed by all of our material desires throwing the whole “Peace Love Unity and Respect” ideals out the window.


However, the dream is still alive today although in a different regard. In my experience at underground burner parties (sorry, you have to know Joe and Dan to be a part of the community), every stranger is as much a family as your blood relative caring for you in your worst moment and dancing along with you with your fire hoop and staff in your best. High fives to strangers and hugs are all around, and every intention is the absolute highest for your newfound friends.


The beauty of all these parties, large and small, isn’t found with the music (even though that’s absolutely fantastic) it’s found within the small groups of people you connect with. Whether the party is large or small, what makes the whole party go ‘round revolves around each and every attendee’s intentions –do you want to get trashed or do you want to enjoy these beautiful souls?


Additionally, what made those underground raves so special is how hard it could be to even figure out it existed, and then those relentless checkpoints. The trail of “he said she said” trickles down into that guy you met in math class, sending you on a trip into the night that gave no promises of really ending up at your expected rave, but more it gave a reason for adventure with some new friends. That’s not to say that we were all content with never ending up at our rave, but it did give us some new experiences and stories we’ll remember when the creases in our skin give way.


Image by Ana-Sophia Brande

Image by Ana-Sophia Brande

In the end, the PLUR community has shifted its focus into a new environment with a more fire feel (at least in my opinion), but that’s not to say we need to crash on their party. When we want to join these gatherings you have to look into yourself and really see what your intentions are, and respect the environment you’re entering. You’re not the center of the universe, but simply a puzzle piece fitting in with your whole, so make sure your ego doesn’t crash into everyone’s bubble. With that in mind, if that scene isn’t your style (or if it is you’ll have to do some digging), all you have to do is start up your own gathering with your own intentions and friends, find that random guy in math class to spread the word and jam out to the DJ. All of the underground raves started with this motive in the first place; you’re absolutely no different, and have just as much opportunity if you try. So good luck, and I hope I find my way into your family so we can high five, hug and dance the night away. 

 

By: Ana-Sophia Brande