Big Acts, Small Venues

To rate the overall quality of any performance there are many different aspects to factor into the equation.  Between the music, artist’s stage presence, audience involvement, visuals, lights, location and more, concerts can range from unexciting to absolutely amazing no matter the artist’s popularity.  However, bigger does not always mean better.

For any live performer, as they move up in popularity their audience size becomes larger and larger, drastically increasing the amount of people to please.  However, when a crowd becomes too large the artist’s ability to satisfy listeners becomes much more difficult.  John Roderick, a musician, stated at the From Woodstock to Coachella: Common Threads in Festival Culture event during the 66th Conference of World Affairs in Boulder, Colorado, “As I moved up to the bigger stage I was much further away from the audience…” Roderick explained that as crowd size increases the musically spiritual connection from each individual to the performer radically decreases.  “[When you begin performing for mass amounts of people] you must learn a new style of playing.  You have to know how to connect to the right amount of people.”

 http://www.visitscotland.com/cms-images/5x3-large/see-do/homecoming/wickerman-festival-crowd

http://www.visitscotland.com/cms-images/5x3-large/see-do/homecoming/wickerman-festival-crowd

When it comes to live music, there is no doubt that the audience’s energy and approval can majorly drive the artist to an insanely monumental performance; without acceptance from the crowd it can be difficult for an artist’s music to evolve into a moving set.  So, what setting makes for the most remarkable concert with maximum audience excitement?  Small venues are the answer.

Close your eyes, and imagine your favorite, most famous, musician.  Now, picture that artist performing for only a few hundred people, and you are in the front row.  Proven this past year, by monumental DJs Pretty Lights and Adventure Club, big acts in small venues are undeniably mind-blowing.  Coming to the Ogden Theatre in Denver, Colorado, in November of 2013 and January of 2014, Pretty Lights and Adventure Club played for sold out crowds in a small city setting.  At both shows, every individual was on their feet and absolutely enchanted by the music being played before them; every soul was encouraging the artists to blow their minds.

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http://distilleryimage0.s3.amazonaws.com/ec09de6a5e5f11e3a7fd12b201d372bb_6.jpg

When popular acts such as these put on small, sold-out concerts it is guaranteed that 99% of the crowd is dying to be there.  This increased level of crowd excitement is absolutely crucial.  Small venues for big acts almost guarantee an enthusiasm and longing in the crowd that drives the entire concert to its utmost potential; everyone is dedicated to carrying out good vibes.  So, when you see your favorite big artists coming to small venues in your area, do not underestimate them.  Grab your ticket fast and prepare for one of the most all-encompassing concerts of your life.  Expect a loving audience with an artist who is motivated to play an amazing show.


Written By: Andrea Inscoe